Integration Link (56 unique benefit summaries found)

Link 10: Freeway Management to Traveler Information


Ninety-four percent of travelers took the action indicated by the DMSs in rural Missouri and drivers were very satisfied by the accuracy of the information provided.(December 2011)

Vehicle speeds decreased significantly in work zones where DMSs were used to inform drivers upstream.(December 2011)

Rural DMSs providing detour information for a full, 3 day bridge closure provided over $21,000 in benefits to motorists in Missouri.(December 2011)

In St. Louis County, Missouri, full closure of portions of I-64 for two years allowed for an accelerated construction schedule, saving taxpayers between $93 million and $187 million.(November 2011)

Weather Notification System issues on time alerts 88.9 percent of time, but message coverage remains incomplete.(August 2010)

Audible "slow traffic ahead" alerts can improve drivers' situational awareness and increase safety on freeways.(June 2011)

Collisions on I-5 in Washington State have been reduced by 65-75 percent in a 7.5 mile corridor where an active traffic management system was deployed.(November 19, 2010)

Simulated deployment of Integrated Corridor Management (ICM) technologies on the I-394 corridor in Minneapolis show a benefit-cost ratio of 22:1 over ten years.(November 2010)

New Jersey Department of Transportation enhanced incident management efficiency by using I-95 Corridor Coalition’s Vehicle Probe Project data, experiencing an estimated savings of $100,000 per incident in user delay costs.(August 12, 2010)

The use of vehicle probes allowed North Carolina and South Carolina to monitor traffic at a quarter of the cost of microwave or radar detectors.(August 12, 2010)

New York State DOT TMC operators and New York State Thruway Authority staff were able to reduce traffic queues by 50 percent using vehicle probe data available through the I-95 Corridor Coalition.(August 12, 2010)

Changeable Message Signs in the Bay Area that displayed highway and transit trip times and departure times for the next train influenced 1.6 percent of motorists to switch to transit when the time savings was less than 15 minutes, and 7.9 percent of motorists to switch to transit when the time savings was greater than 20 minutes.(September 2009)

Intelligent speed control applications that smooth traffic flow during congested conditions can reduce fuel consumption by 10 to 20 percent without drastically affecting overall travel times.(2009)

Integrated Corridor Management (ICM) strategies that promote integration among freeways, arterials, and transit systems can help balance traffic flow and enhance corridor performance; simulation models indicate benefit-to-cost ratios for combined strategies range from 7:1 to 25:1.(2009)

A multi-jurisdictional emergency response crew in the Phoenix metropolitan area provides services to six cities with a benefit-cost ratio of 6.4:1.(August 2007)

In 2006, improvements to Florida's SMART SunGuide Website increased hits to 16,778,000 from 115,000 hits recorded in 2005.(January 2007)

In Myrtle Creek, Oregon, an advanced curve speed warning system installed on I-5 reduced the speed of 76 percent of drivers surveyed.(June 2006)

At the Breezewood Interchange on the Pennsylvania Turnpike, installation of a truck rollover warning system immediately reduced the occurrence of truck rollover crashes.(April 2006)

In rural areas, communication networks that provide immediate access to remote data controls on field data can improve the efficiency and effectiveness of operations and maintenance activities.(5/1/2005)

In North Carolina, a wet pavement detection system on I-85 yielded a 39 percent reduction in the annual crash rate under wet conditions.(August 2004)

In a mountainous area of Spokane, Washington, 94 percent of travelers surveyed indicated that a road weather information website made them better prepared to travel; 56 percent agreed the information helped them avoid travel delays.(8 January 2004)

In a mountainous region of Spokane, Washington, about one-third of CVOs interviewed would consider changing routes based on the information provided on a road weather information website and highway advisory radio system; however, few could identify viable alternate routes. (8 January 2004)

In Tennessee, a low visibility warning system installed on I-75 dramatically reduced fog-related crashes.(May 2003)

A simulation study of the road network in Seattle, Washington demonstrated that providing information on arterials as well as freeways in a traveler information system reduced vehicle-hours of delay by 3.4 percent and reduced the total number of stops by 5.5 percent.(6-9 November 2000)

A simulation study of the road network in Seattle, Washington demonstrated that providing information on arterials as well as freeways in a traveler information system increased throughput by 0.1 percent.(6-9 November 2000)

A simulation study in Seattle found that if 6 to 10 percent of travelers started using pre-trip traveler information during severe weather conditions, there would be a small positive impact on roadway system efficiency and mobility .(October 2000)

In Arizona and Missouri a survey of tourists found that those who used advanced traveler information systems believed the information they received save them time.(30 June 2000)

Modeling indicated that coordinating fixed signal timing plans along congested arterial corridors leading into Seattle, Washington, and incorporating arterial traffic flow data into the traveler information system would reduce vehicle delay by 7 percent and 1.8 percent, respectively.(30 May 2000)

Users of the Advanced Traveler Information System in Seattle, Washington were satisfied with the information on freeway and transit conditions provided via Web sites and a Traffic TV service.(30 May 2000)

Modeling performed as part of an evaluation of nine ITS implementation projects in San Antonio, Texas indicated that integrating DMS, incident management, and arterial traffic control systems could reduce delay by 5.9 percent.(May 2000)

Evaluation of freeway DMS integrated with incident management in San Antonio, Texas, found fuel consumption reduced by 1.2 percent; integrating the DMS with arterial traffic control systems could save 1.4 percent. (May 2000)

Modeling performed as part of an evaluation of nine ITS implementation projects in San Antonio, Texas indicated that users of an improved traveler information web site would receive annual benefits of a 5.4 percent reduction in delay.(May 2000)

Modeling performed as part of an evaluation of nine ITS implementation projects in San Antonio, Texas indicated that drivers of vehicles with in-vehicle navigation devices could experience an 8.1 percent reduction in delay.(May 2000)

In San Antonio, Texas, 60 percent of drivers of transit vehicles equipped with in-vehicle navigation devices reported that they saved time and felt safer.(May 2000)

Evaluation indicated that integrating DMS and incident management systems could reduce crashes by 2.8 percent, and that integrating DMS and arterial traffic control systems could decrease crashes by 2 percent, in San Antonio, Texas.(May 2000)

In San Antonio, Texas, focus group participants felt that DMS were a reliable source of traffic information.(May 2000)

In San Antonio, Texas, usage of a traveler information Web site increased at a rate of 19 percent per year and spiked during severe weather events.(May 2000)

Based on the survey results only 9 percent of households were aware of TravInfo, and less than 1 percent of the Bay area commuters who used traveler information used TravInfo.(25 April 2000)

In Phoenix, Arizona, an evaluation of traveler information provided on cable television found that 29 percent of surveyed respondents thought the traffic channel was useful.(April 2000)

In Phoenix, Arizona, an evaluation of website traveler information found that 16 percent of surveyed respondents thought the web site information was useful.(April 2000)

Adaptive signal control integrated with freeway ramp meters in Glasgow, Scotland increased vehicle throughput 20 percent on arterials and 6 percent on freeways.(January 2000)

Adaptive signal control integrated with freeway ramp meters in Glasgow, Scotland improved network travel times by 10 percent.(January 2000)

A survey of drivers in Glasgow, Scotland, found that 40 percent changed route due to DMS recommendations.(January 2000)

A survey of drivers in Glasgow, Scotland, found that 59 percent of respondents thought that ramp metering was very helpful or fairly helpful.(January 2000)

A simulation study indicated that vehicle throughput would increase if arterial data were integrated with freeway data in an Advanced Traveler Information System in Seattle, Washington. (September 1999)

A simulation study indicated that integrating traveler information with traffic and incident management systems in Seattle, Washington could reduce emissions by 1 to 3 percent, lower fuel consumption by 0.8 percent, and improve fuel economy by 1.3 percent.(September 1999)

A simulation study indicated that integrating traveler information with traffic and incident management systems in Seattle, Washington could diminish delay by 1 to 7 percent, reduce stops by about 5 percent, lower travel time variability by 2.5 percent, and improve trip time reliability by 1.2 percent.(September 1999)

In 1999, a study in Seattle, Washington indicated that participants who used traveler information devices including wrist watches, in-vehicle components, and portable computers found the information was useful for making travel decisions.(5 January 1999)

In Japan, real-time alternative-route travel time information posted on dynamic message signs contributed to a 3.7 percent divergence rate during periods of congestion, saving detoured motorists an average of 9.8 minutes per vehicle.(12-16 October 1998)

The delay reduction benefits of improved incident management in the Greater Houston area saved motorists approximately $8,440,000 annually. (7 February 1997)

Evaluations of the QUARTET PLUS and TABASCO Projects in Europe found that transit signal priority reduced travel time for transit vehicles by 5 to 15 percent.(1994-1998)

In Europe, ITS evaluation reports show that electronic toll collection can decrease traffic volumes by up to 17 percent.(1994-1998)

In Glasglow, Scotland, ITS evaluation reports show that ramp metering can improve freeway capacity by 5 to 13 percent.(1994-1998)

In Europe, a centralized and coordinated paratransit system resulted in a 2 to 3 percent annual decrease in the cost to provide paratransit services.(1994-1998)

In Paris, France, incident management resulted in a nine-minute reduction in response time(1994-1998)

In Europe, ITS studies found customer satisfaction with traveler information delivered via portable electronic devices, public access terminals, Internet web sites, and in-vehicle navigation devices ranged from 50 to 95 percent. (1994-1998)